Summerland campground to provide COVID-safe accommodations for temporary farm-workers

Hubert Pomerleau picks Red Delicious apples from an orchard in Summerland, in this 2016 photo. (Summerland Review file photo)

The managed seasonal worker campsite will be located within a separated area of Peach Orchard Municipal Campground

The District of Summerland, alongside the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture and other partners, has implemented a temporary, COVID-safe campground for seasonal workers.

Providing managed seasonal accommodations for domestic temporary workers, who support farms and the agricultural economy, has been identified as a need for Summerland. Some workers may not be able to be immediately accommodated on farms with new standards. Workers that cannot stay on-farm don’t always have access to safe and sanitary conditions.

The managed seasonal-worker campsite will be located within a separated area of Peach Orchard Municipal Campground. It will include 24/7 onsite supervision and will be monitored regularly by bylaw and RCMP.

Fourteen campsites have been allotted for the workers, allowing a maximum of 50 workers using these facilities at any one time, from July 8 to July 31.

“Seasonal agricultural workers are a designated essential service, and play a crucial and appreciated role in our food supply chain, local and regional agricultural economy”, said Anthony Haddad, the District of Summerland’s CAO.

Haddad said the three-and-a-half week period for agricultural workers, using a small portion of the Peach Orchard Campground, will assist the local agricultural industry.

“The campground has been used in the past by agricultural workers, so we see this as a good short-term solution on land that can accommodate the workers,” Haddad added.

 

An on-site camp manager was specifically hired for the initiative. That person will provide oversight for the workers, and bylaw support will provide further monitoring of the campsite, as required.

The district said the camp is only needed for a short time, while there is an influx of workers during the main cherry harvest season, in advance of the workers relocating to private farm campsites.

After July 31, the infrastructure will be removed, and the 14 sites will be open to the public again.

“Workers in between farm jobs will be able to reduce the risk of COVID-19 by having a safe place to stay, and that is good for everyone,” said Glen Lucas, general manager of the B.C. Fruit Growers Association.

Fruit Growers Association staff will be providing AgSafeBC-approved COVID-19 safety training to all workers who stay in the campsite.

The site will be entirely funded by the Ministry of Agriculture. No funding from the District of Summerland is required.

Protocols and measures to ensure the safety of those at the camp have been developed with the Interior Health Authority. Those measures include the following:

  • On-site COVID Coordinator and site Supervisor 24/7.
  • Separate sanitation facilities and basic hygiene supplies for workers, which will be totally separated from the public.
  • COVID industrial camp standards for cleaning and disinfection.
  • COVID screening and orientation to precautionary practices upon entry to site.
  • Infection Control and Prevention Plans, Emergency, and Isolation Plans developed with health authorities are in place.

MOVIE SHOOT IN OKANAGAN

Okanagan Film Commissioner, Jon Summerland tells Castanet the Okanagan film business has so far survived COVID-19.

“There are four Lifetime movies being shot in the Okanagan right now and through July and August,” says Summerland.

Summerland says an unnamed Hollywood film is also set to begin shooting in mid to late July and one of the reasons they can go ahead is because of the availability of Canadian crews.

“We’ve got skilled people here in B.C. and particularly in the Okanagan, that has allowed us to basically quarantine crews together to shoot these movies.”

Summerland says every production in the Okanagan now has a Health and Safety Officer on set daily to ensure protocols are adhered to.

“We have a dedicated space where everyone has their temperature checked daily and we make sure everything is cleaned and that everyone gets individual hand sanitizers.”

Until recently all of the shoots have been either on location at The Cove on the road or in an open space, “now that things have loosened up a bit we are starting to use different locations like the one on Doyle Ave the other day.”

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Penticton to Host BDO CSSHL Championships for Fifth Consecutive Year

2020 BDO
Canadian Sport School Hockey League (CSSHL) Championships

March 5 – 15, 2020
South Okanagan Events Centre & Surrounding Areas

FIND TICKETS

The 2020 BDO CSSHL Championships are set for March 5-15, 2020 in Penticton, B.C. and will see champions crowned in all seven CSSHL western divisions.

This marks the sixth consecutive year that the City of Penticton has hosted the event, which has grown from 33 teams and 609 student athletes in 2015 to 74 teams and over 1300 student athletes in 2020. Over the past three years, the event has generated an $8.1-million economic impact for the City of Penticton.

“We are excited to have the BDO CSSHL Championships in Penticton for the sixth time,” said Kevin Goodwin, Chief Operating Officer of the CSSHL. “With the partnership we have with Spectra, along with the support we receive from the City of Penticton, Travel Penticton, BDO Canada and the Western Hockey League, we are able to put on a first-class event that showcases the very best in education-based hockey, while making a substantial economic impact to the local community.”

Tickets are $15 for a day pass, $45 for a division pass and $60 for a full 11-day pass. Admission for spectators 18 years old and younger is free. Tickets are available at www.valleyfirsttix.com and in person at the Valley First Box Office at the South Okanagan Events Centre (SOEC).

The majority of games will take place at the Okanagan Hockey Training Centre, Memorial Arena and South Okanagan Events Centre, along with a small amount of games in Oliver and Summerland.

New Year’s Eve Dinner – On New York TIME

Celebrate the coming year with a New York-inspired New Year’s Dinner experience at TIME Winery & Kitchen.

Tue  December 31, 2019  5:00 PM – 10:00 PM

$59 + taxes & gratuity per person (food only) 

Enjoy a celebratory bubbles toast with us at 9 pm, as we countdown to 2020 on New York TIME.

Visit our website for full menu details (6 pm and 9 pm seating available)

  1. Seating is limited. For reservations, please call 236-422-2556 or email chelsea@encorevineyards.ca

Organizer’s Info:

Fire Safety for Children

The Facts:

Children are particularly vulnerable to burns and fire deaths. To prevent fire and burn injuries from affecting your preschooler, teach them the following fire and life safety lessons.

  • Tell a grown-up when you find matches and lighters
  • Practice an escape plan
  • Crawl low, under smoke
  • Cool a burn
  • Stop, Drop, and Roll

Teaching these lessons has proven to save lives. Together, we can make a difference.

Tell a Grown-up when you find Matches and Lighters

Matches and lighters are one of the leading causes of fire deaths among young children. Most children are fascinated with fire and try to imitate adult behaviour.

Teaching tips:

  • Lighters and matches are tools for grown-ups only, not toys for children.
  • Keep lighters and matches stored safely out of reach and out of sight in a locked container.
  • Teach children to tell a grown-up when they find matches and lighters. They should not touch them.
  • Remind smokers to keep matches and lighters safely out of reach.
  • Continuous supervision of young children is the best prevention.

Crawl Low Under Smoke

In a fire, smoke containing toxic gases and heat rises toward the ceiling. This means the cleanest air is closest to the floor.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children to use an alternate route if they encounter smoke or flames during their escape.
  • If they must escape through smoke, children should crawl on their hands and knees staying below the smoke where the air is easier to breathe.

STOP, DROP, and ROLL

Everyone can learn that if their clothes catch on fire,

STOP where you are, do not run.

DROP immediately to the ground and cover your face with your hands.

ROLL over and over to smother the flames.

Practice an Escape Plan

Young children often die in fires because they try to hide from smoke or flames. These needless deaths may easily be prevented by developing a home escape plan.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children that a smoke alarm warns them of fire or smoke and when they hear the sound, they should start their home escape plan.
  • As a family, develop a home escape plan which includes two ways out of every room
  • Make sure everyone in your family knows your family meeting place outside of your home.
  • Practice your plan by sounding the smoke alarm and following your escape routes to your outside meeting place
  • Remind children never to go back inside until a parent or firefighter says it’s “OK” Once safely outside, call 911 from a neighbours house.

Cool a Burn

Running cool water over a burn immediately will reduce its severity.

Teaching tips:

  • Children should be taught to always tell a grown-up if they are burned.
  • Cool the burn by placing it under cool water for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • Never use ice, ointments, or butter on a burn. This traps the heat inside and makes the burn worse.

BCREA Calls for Safer Homes at the 2019 UBCM Convention

British Columbia Real Estate Association’s (BCREA) Government Relations team attended the annual 2019 Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) Convention in Vancouver from September 23 to 27. On the first day of the convention, VP of Government Relations and Stakeholder Engagement Trevor Hargreaves participated in a panel presentation on anti-money laundering, along with Attorney General David Eby and Minister of Finance Carole James.

We also staffed a trade show booth and attended many sessions where we spoke with cabinet ministers, MLAs, mayors and local government councillors. We received interest across the province from delegates who shared BCREA’s commitment to building better neighbourhoods.

One of the issues we promoted is the need for the BC Government to develop a consistent process to remediate homes used to produce drugs. Whether legal or illegal, using homes to produce drugs can have serious negative impacts on the health and safety of future occupants. To promote the issue, we offered delegates hand sanitizer with the tagline, “If only there was a sanitizer for homes used to produce drugs.”

The second issue we showcased is the need for provincial leadership for floodplain mapping. Many homes are in high-risk flood areas, often unknown to the families living in them. Working with local governments, the BC Government should create a province-wide plan to map flood hazards for all BC communities and ensure the maps remain up to date.

The concerns of REALTORS® and BCREA on these issues and others were echoed in several convention sessions and resolutions. Some of the provincial government initiatives we learned about include:

  • a complete overhaul of the legislation used by government for emergency planning; the new approach will include more focus on minimizing the damage of disasters like flooding, so this works well with our recommendation for floodplain maps,
  • plans to develop a home plate policy for homes in the Agricultural Land Reserve; this would create requirements for where a home could be placed on a lot, in addition to how big it can be, and
  • the formation of a provincial-UBCM working group to consider ways to strengthen the regulation of short-term rental properties.

Posted by: Marianne Brimmell

GET IN TOUCH

Suite 1425, 1075 West Georgia St.
Vancouver, BC V6E 3C9
 604.683.7702
 1.844.288.7702
 604.683.8601
bcrea@bcrea.bc.ca

Apartment and High Rise Fire Safety

Fire safety is everyone’s responsibility. Every resident should plan to be fire safe. Since most “high-rise” buildings are constructed of fire resistant materials and contain closed stairwells, fires are generally confined to individual rooms or apartments, furnishings, or possibly one floor.

Two or three storey wood frame buildings have either enclosed stairwells, or if an older building, external fire escapes. Enclosed stairwells have fire doors which must be kept closed at all times!

An apartment or high-rise fire is no cause for panic. If you plan ahead and practice fire drills, your chances of survival are greatly increased. Check with your landlord or building manager to ensure Fire Safety Plans including floor plans and evacuation procedures are posted and visible. Please take time to review and learn them.

What Causes Most Apartment Fires?

  • Cooking / kitchen fires
  • Heating equipment such as heaters, stoves, or space heaters.
  • Smoking is a major cause of fatal apartment fires.

How Important is Prevention?

VITAL – it is the best insurance against fire! Take these simple tips to prevent fires from starting:

  • Be careful with smoking materials. Use large, deep, non-tipping ashtrays and dispose the contents into an airtight metal container or soak the butts before discarding. Check furniture and cushions for dropped matches & cigarettes. Never smoke in bed, especially when under the influence of alcohol or medications.
  • Keep matches and lighters out of the sight and reach of children.
  • Never leave cooking unattended. If a pan catches on fire, use a potholder or oven mitts and slide a lid or a cookie sheet over the flames and turn off the burner.
  • Keep space heaters at least 1 meter (3 ft) from combustibles.
  • Replace worn or damaged electrical cords. Do not overload electrical outlets. Use an approved power bar / electrical receptacle for additional electrical cords.
  • Do not store flammable liquids or compressed gases (ie gas & propane) in your home, car storage, or locker.
  • Do not use balconies for storage. This can block a means of escape, as well as become a target for arsonists.

How Will You Know if there is a Fire?

  • Your building should be equipped with smoke detectors and other fire alarm components.
  • Learn to recognize the sound of the fire alarm and leave the building immediately. Leave the building every time you hear the alarm, as fire may be present in any part of the building. Do not ignore the alarm.
  • It is recommended that every dwelling has a smoke alarm outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For maximum protection, consider installing a smoke alarm in every bedroom.
  • Maintain your alarms, test them once a month, vacuum twice a year, and change the battery annually or when a “chirping” noise occurs. Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years.

What is the Plan for my Building?

  • Floor plans and evacuation procedures should be posted on every floor. Take time to learn them.
  • Develop and practice your fire safety plan. Know the two quickest and safest ways out of your building.
  • Training and implementing a fire warden on each level of the building is recommended to ensure safe evacuation and ongoing safety programs. Have a fire drill at least once a year but practice your escape plans regularly. Coordinate practice drills with neighbours, fellow workers, the floor warden, and the building manager. /li>
  • Assign someone to assist people with disabilities who may need assistance to evacuate safely.
  • Ensure everyone knows what to do when the alarm sounds.
  • After exiting the building, go to a prearranged meeting place. Do not go back into the building for any reason.

How do I Escape from the Fire?

  • Check doors before opening them. Be sure to check a door by kneeling or crouching behind the door. Reach up high and touch the door, knob, and frame. If the door feels cool, open it with caution. Put your shoulder against the door and open it slowly. Slam the door shut if you see flames or smoke on the other side and use another escape route or stay in your apartment.
  • If unable to leave your apartment, protect yourself by placing towels, sheets, or clothes around the door and vents to keep smoke out. Call the Fire Department using 911 to notify them of your location. If there is no smoke outside a window, open it and signal for help by waving a bright towel, sheet, or flashlight. Never use elevators in a fire! Always use the exit stairways and close all doors behind you to slow the spread of fire.
  • If an announcement can be heard over your building’s public address system, listen carefully and follow the directions.
  • If your escape route becomes smokey, crawl low under the smoke. Smoke rises, so the cleanest air is near the floor.
  • If your route becomes impassable due to smoke, heat, or fire, return to your suite or use an alternate escape route. Never go to the roof as you may become trapped with no means of escape or protection.
  • Get out and stay out. Go directly to your planned meeting place and stay there.
  • Call 911 once you have safely escaped the fire.