New Year’s Eve Dinner – On New York TIME

Celebrate the coming year with a New York-inspired New Year’s Dinner experience at TIME Winery & Kitchen.

Tue  December 31, 2019  5:00 PM – 10:00 PM

$59 + taxes & gratuity per person (food only) 

Enjoy a celebratory bubbles toast with us at 9 pm, as we countdown to 2020 on New York TIME.

Visit our website for full menu details (6 pm and 9 pm seating available)

  1. Seating is limited. For reservations, please call 236-422-2556 or email chelsea@encorevineyards.ca

Organizer’s Info:

Christmas Light UP @ Silver Star

One of our biggest nights of the year is back! Come up and enjoy the magic of SilverStar’s annual Christmas Light Up!

Christmas Light UP - Dan Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join us for a night of festivities to kick off the holiday season. We’ll have fun for the whole family: everything from local crafts and talents, hot food and drinks, sleigh rides, fire dancers, fireworks, Santa Claus and more. All in the heart of our mountain village. This is one fun-filled night you’ll definitely not want to miss out on!

*Please note: Our parking lots fill up early (before 5pm) for this event. Please car pool and take advantage of local shuttle services. There will be shuttles running from the parking lots to the village and it’s recommended to park in E lot so that you don’t miss anything while searching for closer parking.

Cost: FREE

New this year: We will be offering $10 sightseeing rides ($30 for 4) on the gondola! There’s nothing quite like seeing the village lights from the top of the mountain inside a cozy gondola cabin. If you’re lucky with your timing, you may even witness the fireworks during your ride! There will be multiple locations in the village to purchase a sight seeing ticket. The gondola will be running from 5pm to 7:30pm with last cabin loading at 7:20pm.

*Season pass holders ride for free

  • Friday, November 29, 2019
  • 5:00 PM  7:30 PM
  • SilverStar Mountain Resort123 Shortt StreetBC, V1B 3M1Canada

Google Calendar  ICS

* Please double check date, time and location with the host, as this information is subject to change *

Housing Market Update Webcast November 2019

Watch BCREA Chief Economist Brendon Ogmundson discuss the October 2019 statistics.

Click here to visit our YouTube channel. Read the news release here.

For more information, please contact:
Brendon Ogmundson
Chief Economist
Direct: 604.742.2796
Mobile: 604.505.6793
Email: bogmundson@bcrea.bc.ca

Home Sales Continue Normalization Trend in October

Vancouver, BC – November 13, 2019. The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) reports that a total of 7,666 residential unit sales were recorded by the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in October, an increase of 19.3 per cent from the same month last year. The average MLS® residential price in the province was $724,045, an increase of 5.1 per cent from October 2018. Total sales dollar volume was $5.55 billion, a 25.4 per cent increase from the same month last year.

chart

“Most markets around the province are returning to a more typical level of sales activity,” said BCREA Chief Economist Brendon Ogmundson. “That recovery in sales and slower listings activity is putting upward pressure on prices in many markets.”

MLS® residential active listings in the province were up 1 per cent from September 2018 to 36,567 units, although down slightly when compared on a seasonally adjusted basis. With sales and listings down, overall market conditions in the province have tightened, with a sales-to-active listings ratio of 21 per cent.

Year-to-date, BC residential sales dollar volume was down 9 per cent to $45.3 billion, compared with the same period in 2018. Residential unit sales were 6.2 per cent lower at 65,468 units, while the average MLS® residential price was down 3 per cent year-to-date at $691,618.

For more information, please contact: 

Brendon Ogmundson
Chief Economist
Direct: 604.742.2796
Mobile: 604.505.6793
Email: bogmundson@bcrea.bc.ca

Fire Safety for Children

The Facts:

Children are particularly vulnerable to burns and fire deaths. To prevent fire and burn injuries from affecting your preschooler, teach them the following fire and life safety lessons.

  • Tell a grown-up when you find matches and lighters
  • Practice an escape plan
  • Crawl low, under smoke
  • Cool a burn
  • Stop, Drop, and Roll

Teaching these lessons has proven to save lives. Together, we can make a difference.

Tell a Grown-up when you find Matches and Lighters

Matches and lighters are one of the leading causes of fire deaths among young children. Most children are fascinated with fire and try to imitate adult behaviour.

Teaching tips:

  • Lighters and matches are tools for grown-ups only, not toys for children.
  • Keep lighters and matches stored safely out of reach and out of sight in a locked container.
  • Teach children to tell a grown-up when they find matches and lighters. They should not touch them.
  • Remind smokers to keep matches and lighters safely out of reach.
  • Continuous supervision of young children is the best prevention.

Crawl Low Under Smoke

In a fire, smoke containing toxic gases and heat rises toward the ceiling. This means the cleanest air is closest to the floor.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children to use an alternate route if they encounter smoke or flames during their escape.
  • If they must escape through smoke, children should crawl on their hands and knees staying below the smoke where the air is easier to breathe.

STOP, DROP, and ROLL

Everyone can learn that if their clothes catch on fire,

STOP where you are, do not run.

DROP immediately to the ground and cover your face with your hands.

ROLL over and over to smother the flames.

Practice an Escape Plan

Young children often die in fires because they try to hide from smoke or flames. These needless deaths may easily be prevented by developing a home escape plan.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children that a smoke alarm warns them of fire or smoke and when they hear the sound, they should start their home escape plan.
  • As a family, develop a home escape plan which includes two ways out of every room
  • Make sure everyone in your family knows your family meeting place outside of your home.
  • Practice your plan by sounding the smoke alarm and following your escape routes to your outside meeting place
  • Remind children never to go back inside until a parent or firefighter says it’s “OK” Once safely outside, call 911 from a neighbours house.

Cool a Burn

Running cool water over a burn immediately will reduce its severity.

Teaching tips:

  • Children should be taught to always tell a grown-up if they are burned.
  • Cool the burn by placing it under cool water for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • Never use ice, ointments, or butter on a burn. This traps the heat inside and makes the burn worse.

BCREA 2019 Fourth Quarter Housing Forecast: BC Homes Sales Carry Momentum into 2020

To view the BCREA Housing Forecast PDF, click here.

Vancouver, BC – November 6, 2019. The British Columbia Real Estate Association (BCREA) released its 2019 Fourth Quarter Housing Forecast today.

Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) residential sales in the province are forecast to decline 1.8 per cent to about 77,100 units this year, after recording 78,505 residential sales in 2018. MLS® residential sales are forecast to increase 10.9 per cent to 85,500 units in 2020, just below the 10-year average for MLS® residential sales of 85,800 units.

“After a slow start to 2019, MLS® home sales in BC have embarked on a sustained upward trend since the spring,” said Brendon Ogmundson, BCREA Chief Economist. “The dampening effects of federal mortgage rules mean that rather than a return to the heights of recent years, home sales are simply returning to trend after sustaining a significant shock.”

As demand normalizes, the accumulation of resale inventory has reversed course in many markets around BC. We anticipate that this trend will continue in 2020, with sales and listings finding balance. For most markets, this will mean price growth that is in-line with inflation, though for some supply-constrained areas we are forecasting strong price growth. We anticipate that the MLS® average price will decline 2 per cent in 2019 before rising modestly by 3.6 per cent to $723,000 in 2020.

For the complete news release, including detailed statistics, click here.

For more information, please contact:
Brendon Ogmundson
Chief Economist
Direct: 604.742.2796
Mobile: 604.505.6793
bogmundson@bcrea.bc.ca

Kellie Fong
Economist
Direct: 778.357.0831
Mobile: 604-366-6511
kfong@bcrea.bc.ca

Tips For Waste Reduction

What are the 5 R’s of Waste Reduction?

Zero Waste

1) Reduce 

The most important part of waste minimization. Reducing waste means not purchasing goods to begin within, limiting your consumption to mostly needs and limited wants, saying no to excess packaging, and one-time use items.

2) Reuse

Second most desirable on the waste minimization triangle. Reuse includes repairing broken items, finding new purposes for or donating old and unused items, and using things like reusable shopping bag and water bottles as alternatives to single-use items.

3) Recycle

Recycling is what you do if you CANNOT reduce or reuse an item. Recycle as much as possible to keep material out of landfills. Remember that not properly sorting recycling can do more harm than good, to learn more about how to sort your recycling by visit the Curbside Recycling or Landfill Recycling Depot pages.

4) Recover

As it applies to waste minimization, is reclaiming energy or recyclable materials from the waste stream.This is typically done by waste to energy technology.

5) Residuals

The last phase in the triangle. Residual management is the final treatment and/or disposal of a waste that cannot be used in any other way. This means disposing of it in your curbside garbage cart, or taking it to the landfill.

At Home:

1) Recycle More & Better

Most materials are in-fact recyclable. Did you know that when we don’t properly sort recycling (i.e. plastic bags in curbside recycling) it can make the whole recycle truck end up in the landfill? Learn more about recycling by visiting the Landfill Recycling Depot and Curbside Recycling pages.

2) Make Use of Leftovers

Try ‘Kitchen Sink’ recipes to reduce food waste. Use old vegetables, leftovers and products gone unused to keep edible food out of landfills. Recipes like quiche, stir-fry’s, and soup are all good examples of putting leftovers to use, not only will this reduce waste, but it saves money!

3) Avoid

Do not use single-use items in your home. Consider ceramic dishware, metal or bamboo cutlery, and glass products instead of their disposable counter-parts. Use cloths instead of paper towel. Simple switches can go a long way.

 

 

 

 

In Your Yard:

1) Consider Composting

A large portion of waste in landfills is in-fact compostable material that could have been re-purposed into good-for-your-garden compost.  Vegetable scraps, egg shell, coffee grinds, tea bags and more can all be composted.Interested in composting at home? Check out the RDOS compost bin sale by clicking here. For more information on composting at home click here.

2) Try ‘Grasscycling’

Grasscycling is the practice of leaving grass clippings on the lawn after mowing. Letting clippings decompose naturally back into grass restores Nitrogen, helps lawns retain water, and keeps lawns healthy. Grasscycling keeps lawns green,and reduces yard waste going to landfills. To learn more about natural lawn care click here.

3) USE Your Compost

Using compost not only gives plants the nutrients they need to grow strong, but helps them retain water. This reduces irrigation needs. Further, using compost limits the need for other garden products(i.e. fertilizers), keeping your lawn green and saving you money! Learn more about compost here.

 

 

 

 

Shopping:

1) Bring Your Own

Bring your own grocery bags, mesh net bags for produce, and containers for packaging goods and carrying them. Keep containers and bags in your car or purse to ensure they’re always with you and not forgotten!

2) Buy Bulk

Consider purchasing bulk goods which can be put into reusable containers, bags and your own packaging. This eliminates unnecessary waste from packaging, lets you purchase the correct amount for your needs (no excess), and re-purposes old or unused containers.

3) Know Your Needs vs.Wants

Only purchase items you know you’ll use. Distinguish needs from wants. Ask yourself: is this a one-time use item or do I already own something similar? Am I purchasing this on an impulse or have I thought about it for at least a month?

 

 

 

 

General Tips:

1) Eliminate Single Use

Bring a reusable coffee mug with you to avoid using paper coffee cups which either requires recycling (using energy and resources), or ends up in landfills. Use refillable water bottles instead of plastic ones. Many shops offer a small discount for bringing your own mug, ask at the counter.

2) Reduce Your Emissions

Summerland is a community where many people are fortunate to live close to work, grocery stores, schools etc. Where it is feasible, consider walking, carpooling, or biking to where you need to go. Reducing your carbon footprint significantly contributes to a waste reduction lifestyle.

3) Be Water Conscious

Water is a limited resource in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. Try reducing your shower time, washing only full loads of laundry, and washing in cold, instead of hot water. Water plants and compost piles with leftover “grey water” from bathing, washing dishes, etc. Be sure that water doesn’t contain any harmful soaps.