Light Up The Vines

Light Up The Vines - Dan Jones

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY NOV. 23, SATURDAY NOV. 30 AND SUNDAY DEC. 1, 2019

Light Up The Vines runs 3 — 8 p.m.

Summerland’s Bottleneck Drives 18 wineries, 3 cideries, brewery, and distillery will open their doors and turn on the holiday lights from 3 pm to 8 pm. Visitors can ‘Sip ‘n Shop’ their way along Bottleneck Drive and enjoy tastings, live music, holiday lights and special discounts on some of the region’s best wines, ciders, beer, and spirits. Just in time for holiday entertaining and gift-giving. Some of the tasting rooms will offer special treats like warm spiced cider or mulled wine, bonfires, complimentary snacks like crepes or bratwurst and DIY s’ mores to name a few.

Visitors also have a chance to win a prize package valued at over $500 by collecting five stamps with a ‘Light up the Vines’ passport. Available at participating tasting rooms along the way.

*Tasting fees may apply and include donations to Critteraid and the Summerland Food Bank.

Fire Safety for Children

The Facts:

Children are particularly vulnerable to burns and fire deaths. To prevent fire and burn injuries from affecting your preschooler, teach them the following fire and life safety lessons.

  • Tell a grown-up when you find matches and lighters
  • Practice an escape plan
  • Crawl low, under smoke
  • Cool a burn
  • Stop, Drop, and Roll

Teaching these lessons has proven to save lives. Together, we can make a difference.

Tell a Grown-up when you find Matches and Lighters

Matches and lighters are one of the leading causes of fire deaths among young children. Most children are fascinated with fire and try to imitate adult behaviour.

Teaching tips:

  • Lighters and matches are tools for grown-ups only, not toys for children.
  • Keep lighters and matches stored safely out of reach and out of sight in a locked container.
  • Teach children to tell a grown-up when they find matches and lighters. They should not touch them.
  • Remind smokers to keep matches and lighters safely out of reach.
  • Continuous supervision of young children is the best prevention.

Crawl Low Under Smoke

In a fire, smoke containing toxic gases and heat rises toward the ceiling. This means the cleanest air is closest to the floor.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children to use an alternate route if they encounter smoke or flames during their escape.
  • If they must escape through smoke, children should crawl on their hands and knees staying below the smoke where the air is easier to breathe.

STOP, DROP, and ROLL

Everyone can learn that if their clothes catch on fire,

STOP where you are, do not run.

DROP immediately to the ground and cover your face with your hands.

ROLL over and over to smother the flames.

Practice an Escape Plan

Young children often die in fires because they try to hide from smoke or flames. These needless deaths may easily be prevented by developing a home escape plan.

Teaching tips:

  • Teach children that a smoke alarm warns them of fire or smoke and when they hear the sound, they should start their home escape plan.
  • As a family, develop a home escape plan which includes two ways out of every room
  • Make sure everyone in your family knows your family meeting place outside of your home.
  • Practice your plan by sounding the smoke alarm and following your escape routes to your outside meeting place
  • Remind children never to go back inside until a parent or firefighter says it’s “OK” Once safely outside, call 911 from a neighbours house.

Cool a Burn

Running cool water over a burn immediately will reduce its severity.

Teaching tips:

  • Children should be taught to always tell a grown-up if they are burned.
  • Cool the burn by placing it under cool water for 10 – 15 minutes.
  • Never use ice, ointments, or butter on a burn. This traps the heat inside and makes the burn worse.

Tips For Waste Reduction

What are the 5 R’s of Waste Reduction?

Zero Waste

1) Reduce 

The most important part of waste minimization. Reducing waste means not purchasing goods to begin within, limiting your consumption to mostly needs and limited wants, saying no to excess packaging, and one-time use items.

2) Reuse

Second most desirable on the waste minimization triangle. Reuse includes repairing broken items, finding new purposes for or donating old and unused items, and using things like reusable shopping bag and water bottles as alternatives to single-use items.

3) Recycle

Recycling is what you do if you CANNOT reduce or reuse an item. Recycle as much as possible to keep material out of landfills. Remember that not properly sorting recycling can do more harm than good, to learn more about how to sort your recycling by visit the Curbside Recycling or Landfill Recycling Depot pages.

4) Recover

As it applies to waste minimization, is reclaiming energy or recyclable materials from the waste stream.This is typically done by waste to energy technology.

5) Residuals

The last phase in the triangle. Residual management is the final treatment and/or disposal of a waste that cannot be used in any other way. This means disposing of it in your curbside garbage cart, or taking it to the landfill.

At Home:

1) Recycle More & Better

Most materials are in-fact recyclable. Did you know that when we don’t properly sort recycling (i.e. plastic bags in curbside recycling) it can make the whole recycle truck end up in the landfill? Learn more about recycling by visiting the Landfill Recycling Depot and Curbside Recycling pages.

2) Make Use of Leftovers

Try ‘Kitchen Sink’ recipes to reduce food waste. Use old vegetables, leftovers and products gone unused to keep edible food out of landfills. Recipes like quiche, stir-fry’s, and soup are all good examples of putting leftovers to use, not only will this reduce waste, but it saves money!

3) Avoid

Do not use single-use items in your home. Consider ceramic dishware, metal or bamboo cutlery, and glass products instead of their disposable counter-parts. Use cloths instead of paper towel. Simple switches can go a long way.

 

 

 

 

In Your Yard:

1) Consider Composting

A large portion of waste in landfills is in-fact compostable material that could have been re-purposed into good-for-your-garden compost.  Vegetable scraps, egg shell, coffee grinds, tea bags and more can all be composted.Interested in composting at home? Check out the RDOS compost bin sale by clicking here. For more information on composting at home click here.

2) Try ‘Grasscycling’

Grasscycling is the practice of leaving grass clippings on the lawn after mowing. Letting clippings decompose naturally back into grass restores Nitrogen, helps lawns retain water, and keeps lawns healthy. Grasscycling keeps lawns green,and reduces yard waste going to landfills. To learn more about natural lawn care click here.

3) USE Your Compost

Using compost not only gives plants the nutrients they need to grow strong, but helps them retain water. This reduces irrigation needs. Further, using compost limits the need for other garden products(i.e. fertilizers), keeping your lawn green and saving you money! Learn more about compost here.

 

 

 

 

Shopping:

1) Bring Your Own

Bring your own grocery bags, mesh net bags for produce, and containers for packaging goods and carrying them. Keep containers and bags in your car or purse to ensure they’re always with you and not forgotten!

2) Buy Bulk

Consider purchasing bulk goods which can be put into reusable containers, bags and your own packaging. This eliminates unnecessary waste from packaging, lets you purchase the correct amount for your needs (no excess), and re-purposes old or unused containers.

3) Know Your Needs vs.Wants

Only purchase items you know you’ll use. Distinguish needs from wants. Ask yourself: is this a one-time use item or do I already own something similar? Am I purchasing this on an impulse or have I thought about it for at least a month?

 

 

 

 

General Tips:

1) Eliminate Single Use

Bring a reusable coffee mug with you to avoid using paper coffee cups which either requires recycling (using energy and resources), or ends up in landfills. Use refillable water bottles instead of plastic ones. Many shops offer a small discount for bringing your own mug, ask at the counter.

2) Reduce Your Emissions

Summerland is a community where many people are fortunate to live close to work, grocery stores, schools etc. Where it is feasible, consider walking, carpooling, or biking to where you need to go. Reducing your carbon footprint significantly contributes to a waste reduction lifestyle.

3) Be Water Conscious

Water is a limited resource in the beautiful Okanagan Valley. Try reducing your shower time, washing only full loads of laundry, and washing in cold, instead of hot water. Water plants and compost piles with leftover “grey water” from bathing, washing dishes, etc. Be sure that water doesn’t contain any harmful soaps.

2019 Summerland Light Up

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 2019 | 4:00PM – 9:00PM | DOWNTOWN SUMMERLAND

The Festival of Lights was conceived 32 years ago by 4 Summerland Businessmen, Jerry Hallquist, Art Sewell, Allan Fabbi and Bruce Hallquist under the umbrella of the Downtown Business Improvement Area of the day. It was originally started to help showcase the businesses of downtown Summerland and it certainly has over the years.

To get the event started, the committee sold strings of Christmas lights to every merchant/building owners in the downtown area, to decorate their buildings and approximately 25,000 lights were sold that first year. The District of Summerland became involved and decorated the light standards on the streets and other public buildings in the downtown area.

At the time, it was the only festival of its kind in the Okanagan and has been well attended every year!  Out of all the festivals that were done over the early years in downtown, no one had any idea that the Summerland Festival pf Lights would be the only one to survive 32 years later.  Festival of Lights was an instant success with an estimated 4,000 to 5,000 people in attendance for the first event.  It continues to thrive today and is not only a premier holiday event for Summerland, but for the whole Okanagan.